Variations of Burmese Shan Tofu video

Video Description

Variations in Burmese Shan tofu cuisine.

Shan Tofu is made from yellow split pea flour rather than soy beans like the tofu familiar from Japan, China and Korea.

It's more like polenta in terms of texture, taste and consistency and also in the way it can be treated.

Here we have tofu crackers, tofu fritters, tofu salad and warm tofu.

There's also a guest appearance by rice tofu - but we won't go into that now ...

Comments

shantihhh profile page

shantihhh says :

wE wish to learn MMORE of the real Burmese culture and cuisne, but am noT comfortable to venture again to this amazing coutNy. We are planning on a family ( OUR SON, WIFE AND GRAND-CHILDREN) trip to SE ASIA IN DEC. PLEASE WRITE ME SHANTHHH@SBCGLOBAL.NET . Shanti/Mary-Anne
Posted on: 15 March 2008 - 1:41am
meemalee profile page

meemalee says :

I really wish there were more Burmese restaurants in the UK - you're so lucky! As far as I know there is only the one (in London) and it has quite a limited menu unfortunately. I'm glad you had the opportunity to travel around Burma - you're spot on about Mandalay being Chinese influenced and Rangoon being Indian influenced. Dishes with the same name will vary wildly between the two towns. As for the mohinga recipe - it seems like a very good one, but I'm surprised by the choice of carbohydrate - mohinga is always eaten with rice noodles (vermicelli strands) - wheat noodles such as somen or spaghettini sound like sacrilege :-)
Posted on: 14 March 2008 - 3:18pm
shantihhh profile page

shantihhh says :

Thank you so much for this info. Very few know of the wonderful and diverse cuisine of Burma. Please let us know when your cookbook is available! We were first introduced to this marvelous cuisine over 20 years ago by Philip Chiu and his wife, Nancy when they first opened their restaurant - Nan Yang. It originally was in Oakland Chinatown, but years ago moved to a trendier area on College Ave. He was an archetect in Burma before leaving for the US-so their children could be educated here. Unfortunately I think the quality of the food has declined or I have just changed my expectations of Brmese food after having visted there 3 times. However the Curried Chicken Noodle soup (a bit like Kho Soy in NE Thaiand) is lovely! Of course the Fermented Tea Leaf Salad has always been a favourite of ours, but not as zesty as in Burma. The ginger salad is a wonderful melange of shredded fresh ginger, cabbage and onion with toasted peanuts, fava beans, split peas, coconut chips, tossed with lemon juice and garlic. Fish noodle soup is an authentic Burmese soup. In Nan Yang, they use catfish and lots of spice. Eight treasure bean curd is interesting. That is actually the Chinese style daikon dim sum you can have in Chinese restaurant without the daikon. In this dish, they use rice flour and cornstarch to make a dough to mix with Chinese style preserved pork in it to steam and then fried. It's texture is similar to tofu. Garlic noodle with seafood has the special coconut curry sauce on top with the scallops, prawns, and mussels. It is good but for us too mild. Perhaps our palates have adjusted to the wonderful heat of Thai food and we are expecting some heat. When we have visited Burma the cuisine reallty varied greatly by region Mandalay had a definate Chinese taste, whereas around Inlay Lake the food was a little bit spicier. In Rangoon some spots had real Indian influence, and In Baigan area the food was very country style simple and great. Burmese cuisine is diverse and facinating-I look forward to your book! Philip has shared his recipe for Mohingar and I wouuld be curious what you think of it. http://books.google.com/books?id=vSfA70wFhxUC&pg=PA60&lpg=PA60&dq=nan+yang+oakland+sf+chronicle&source=web&ots=N8FsLED0Jw&sig=wMC8Aq95AIUfp7hj0e1G2tPVqqA&hl=en Shanti/Mary-Anne
Posted on: 12 March 2008 - 1:46pm
shantihhh profile page

shantihhh says :

I thought so absolutely facinating and we have been to Burma 3 times.............last time was about 7 years ago. I love the people and the beautiful country! Somday we hope to visit again. Have you written any other wikipedia etc. about the Burmese food or culture? Shanti/Mary-Anne
Posted on: 11 March 2008 - 9:31pm
meemalee profile page

meemalee says :

Yeah, my dad and I wrote a lot of that :-)
Posted on: 11 March 2008 - 2:52pm
shantihhh profile page

shantihhh says :

This video facinates me-the tofu look so different so I asked the person whose video it is about the recipe. Well I was directed to Wikipedia for an amazing article on Shan Tofu. What is amazing is that it is not soy beans, but channa dal flour/besan ((Pare Hmont)(Garam Dhal Powder)) or split yellow peas. The latter is served warm and creamy/sticky as a salad dressing n Shan state. from Wikipedia about Burmese tofu: - To hpu thouk or tofu salad with either to hpu or hsan ta hpo is very popular as a snack or a meal in itself whereas fried tofu on its own is considered a snack. Both may form part of a meal where all the dishes are customarily shared at the same time. Fresh tofu, cut into small rectangular slices, constitutes the main ingredient of the salad, dressed and garnished with peanut oil, dark soy sauce, rice vinegar, toasted crushed dried chilli, crushed garlic, crushed roasted peanuts, crisp-fried onions, and coriander. To hpu gyaw thouk refers to tofu fritters cut up and served as a salad as above. To hpu nway (warm tofu) or to hpu byaw (soft tofu) is the soft creamy tofu served hot before it sets, usually as a salad dressed and garnished the same way. It may be combined in the same dish with tofu fritters or rice noodles. To read a complete read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burmese_tofu Shanti/Mary-Anne
Posted on: 11 March 2008 - 1:10pm
Variations of Burmese Shan Tofu
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