Mardi Gras Food

The Mardi Gras recipes have evolved around the Mardi Gras celebration period. The term Mardi Gras (pronounced as mardigra) refers to Fat Tuesday in French. The English equivalent of Mardi Gras is Shrove Tuesday. It is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. The Lent season begins from Ash Wednesday and during which fasting is observed in many cultures. So symbolically, Mardi Gras would be the day or the season before Lent, during which rich, fatty foods are consumed. Mardi Gras recipesare essentially very rich. The Mardi Gras season is also known as the Carnival Season and this season also sees many social conventions, parades and celebrations in general.

 

 

Traditional Mardi Gras Recipes
In countries like the Great Britain, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia, Mardi Grasis known as Pancake Tuesday. The pancakes are thinner than the usual ones and the come topped with powdered sugar and different sweet syrups. These pancakes are made in different shapes like coins, thimbles and rings. Traditionally, these pancakes were consumed along with eggs and milk, so as to use them up before the Lent season.

 

In Poland one of the main traditional Mardi Gras recipes is the Paczki. Paczki is a deep fried dough ball with a sweet filling. The Paczkis are coated with powdered sugar or with sweet syrup.

 

The Semla, a semolina sweet bun, is the traditional Mardi Gras food of Sweden. The Semla is sometimes flavored with cardamom and is served with milk.

 

The Icelanders celebrate Mardi Gras as Sprengidagur. Their traditional Mardi Gras food would include Salted meat with peas. Estonia's Shrove Tuesday is called as Vastlapaev and during which ham and split peas soup is made and served in huge quantities.

 

Malasadas  are made in Hawaii, USA during this day. It is the traditional Mardi Gras recipe of Hawaii. The Malasadas are Portuguese Doughnuts. Traditionally they were made in the Sugarcane plantations. In Hawaii, this day is also known as Malasada Day.

 

In New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, the King Cake is one of the prime Mardi Gras recipes made year after year. It is a toffee cake covered in colorful icing. Each cake has a hidden plastic token or a plastic baby toy and who ever finds it must throw a King Cake party the next year.

 

 

Significance of Mardi Gras Recipes
Rich, fatty Mardi Gras recipes were made to use up all the perishable dairy products and eggs before the Lent season began.

 

 

Modern Mardi Gras Recipes and Their Variations
As time passes, newer additions are made to the Mardi Gras food list. The Ricotta cheese pancakes ,  New Orleans Chicken Stew and Meat ball dishes are some of the newer inclusions. There are more spicier Creole Mardi Gras recipes like the Chicken Sausage Gumbo and Dirty Rice.

 

 

Mardi Gras FoodTrivia
The Mardi Gras recipes have evolved around the Mardi Gras celebration period. The term Mardi Gras (pronounced as mardigra) refers to Fat Tuesday in French. The English equivalent of Mardi Gras is Shrove Tuesday. It is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday. The Lent season begins from Ash Wednesday and during which fasting is observed in many cultures. So symbolically, Mardi Gras would be the day or the season before Lent, during which rich, fatty foods are consumed. Mardi Gras recipesare essentially very rich. The Mardi Gras season is also known as the Carnival Season and this season also sees many social conventions, parades and celebrations in general.

 

 

Traditional Mardi Gras Recipes
In countries like the Great Britain, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia, Mardi Grasis known as Pancake Tuesday. The pancakes are thinner than the usual ones and the come topped with powdered sugar and different sweet syrups. These pancakes are made in different shapes like coins, thimbles and rings. Traditionally, these pancakes were consumed along with eggs and milk, so as to use them up before the Lent season.

In Poland one of the main traditional Mardi Gras recipes is the Paczki. Paczki is a deep fried dough ball with a sweet filling. The Paczkis are coated with powdered sugar or with sweet syrup.

The Semla, a semolina sweet bun, is the traditional Mardi Gras food of Sweden. The Semla is sometimes flavored with cardamom and is served with milk.

The Icelanders celebrate Mardi Gras as Sprengidagur. Their traditional Mardi Gras food would include Salted meat with peas. Estonia's Shrove Tuesday is called as Vastlapaev and during which ham and split peas soup is made and served in huge quantities.

Malasadas  are made in Hawaii, USA during this day. It is the traditional Mardi Gras recipe of Hawaii. The Malasadas are Portuguese Doughnuts. Traditionally they were made in the Sugarcane plantations. In Hawaii, this day is also known as Malasada Day.

In New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, the King Cake is one of the prime Mardi Gras recipes made year after year. It is a toffee cake covered in colorful icing. Each cake has a hidden plastic token or a plastic baby toy and who ever finds it must throw a King Cake party the next year.

Significance of Mardi Gras Recipes

Rich, fatty Mardi Gras recipes were made to use up all the perishable dairy products and eggs before the Lent season began.

 

Modern Mardi Gras Recipes and Their Variations

As time passes, newer additions are made to the Mardi Gras food list. The Ricotta cheese pancakes ,  New Orleans Chicken Stew and Meat ball dishes are some of the newer inclusions. There are more spicier Creole Mardi Gras recipes like the Chicken Sausage Gumbo and Dirty Rice.

 

Mardi Gras FoodTrivia
Pancake races are held on Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day) all over in the United Kingdom. Women participate in these races. The race criteria is that they have toss the pancakes in a pan while they run towards the finish line. The quickest and the most skillful participant would be termed as the winner.

 

Pancake races are held on Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day) all over in the United Kingdom. Women participate in these races. The race criteria is that they have toss the pancakes in a pan while they run towards the finish line. The quickest and the most skillful participant would be termed as the winner.

Mardi Gras Food Blogs

5 Good Reasons To Make Sweet 16 Mardi Gras Cakes

5 Good Reasons To Make Sweet 16 Mardi Gras Cakes On : 22-Mar-2011 By : foodjunky

  Sweet 16 Mardi Gras cakes  for a sweet 16 party will be like icing on a cake. When you are throwing a lavish sweet 16 party, you got to have a cake that totally goes well with the party theme. If you aren’t yet convinced with the...

7 Easy Tips To Make Mardi Gras Cupcakes For Kids Party

7 Easy Tips To Make Mardi Gras Cupcakes For Kids Party On : 11-Mar-2011 By : foodmaniac

Mardi Gras cupcakes are smaller kid’s version of big Mardy Gras king cake. Mardi Gras Party is a part of epiphany festival. Be it is a kids’ party or a general get together, having cake and sharing it with friends is part of Mardi Gras convention....

Top 10 Mardi Gras Punch Ideas

Top 10 Mardi Gras Punch Ideas On : 14-Mar-2011 By : priyam

  Mardi Gras punch are the quintessential part of all Mardi Gars celebrations. Mardi Gras is celebrated in honor of the last few days before the beginning of Lent. Mardi Gras is celebrated by most people irrespective of the fact whether...

Shake-a-laka Cocktail For Mardi Gras

Shake-a-laka Cocktail For Mardi Gras On : 28-Feb-2014 By : seasonal_foodie

Mardi Gras is synonymous with carnivals and no celebration is going to be complete without its traditional drink. Well, this occasion has one created exclusively for it too . Yes, it’s the classic Ramon Gin Fizz that goes way back to 1888.   ...

Mardi Gras Food Photos

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