Tips on How to Grow Winter and Spring Vegetables

 
13-Dec-2010 by

Tending to your own kitchen garden is a fun thing to do. To be able to prepare your favourite dishes, using the very same things you have grown.... it is indeed a proud moment. But with winter setting in, one can’t be more careful about their kitchen garden. Here are a few tips on how to grow winter and spring vegetables. It needs to be tended well, and kept safe from slugs and parasites.

 

Certain parts of the US, like the northern regions, are more suited for winter plantations, while others rely on green houses and hot beds. One of the most important aspects of gardening in the winter is, knowing when your region gets the killing frost. It is advisable to back time from that date, and plant your crop accordingly. This way you can harvest before the hard biting winter.

 

Do Not Harvest And Store.

One can be a little tempted to harvest and store the vegetables, to keep them from getting frost bitten. But remember your veggies will keep better in the round that in your store room or fridge. Most summer and autumn crops will last underground till past Christmas. Leeks, onions and potatoes can last till January. The same cannot be said about carrots, as there are chances of the carrot fly attacking the same.

 

Storing Vegetables

If you feel that it is time to harvest your crop, then be careful about how you store them. It is best to hang them, because this way they last longer. Onions and shallots can be planted together and hung above the stove, and these will last for a couple of months, and will give your kitchen the old fashioned inviting look. The same applies to tomatoes. They will last a couple of weeks if they are left on vines and hung in a shaded area. 

 

Preparing for Winter

Preparing for the winter months is a process by itself. After that last leaf has fallen in the autumn wind, it is time to rake and burn them all. Everything from the weeds and the seeds of the previous season has to be destroyed. This has to be done before the ground gets frosted over. Now you can get a good yield only if your crops are sown in fertile soil. So prepare the ground well for the next season.

 

Being an inevitable part of Christmas dinner, planting Brussels sprouts in your winter garden will be a good idea. These will take about 100 days from planting to harvest. Alternatively you can get some seeds from the merchant and plant your garlic in November. For every clove you plant, you can harvest a garlic head in about six months. You will know they are ready for harvesting when the leaves turn yellow and starts to fall out.

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