Is It Safe To Eat Bean Sprouts During Pregnancy?

 
05-Apr-2012 by


Bean Sprouts One of the most well-known ingredients of Asian cuisine, bean sprouts are prepared by moistening and storing the beans till they begin to germinate. But are bean sprouts safe to be consumed when pregnant although this process of sprouting is said to increase the digestibility and nutrient content of the beans.  Is the bacterial growth in bean sprouts harmful to pregnant women? Trail down for answers and decide whether the sprouts are safe enough.

 

 

Health Benefits Of Bean Sprouts Consumption In Pregnancy:

  • Sprouting increases the digestibility and reduces the non-nutritive elements of the beans and so is beneficial in pregnancy.
  • It provides instant energy to expectant moms and helps in relieving fatigue and stress.
  • Vitamin C and zinc content of sprouts has antioxidant properties which helps in warding off infections during pregnancy and boosts immunity.
  • Potassium content of sprouts helps in electrolytic balance of the fluids in the body. This helps in maintaining proper blood pressure levels in pregnant women.
  • The fiber content of the sprouts helps in proper functioning of the digestive system and so relieves problems linked with digestive system in pregnancy.
  • The iron content of bean sprouts helps in preventing anemia in mom-to-be.
  • Folic acid in bean sprouts helps in preventing neural tube defects in new-born.
  • It is also capable of lowering the LDL levels and so is helpful in maintaining a healthy lipid profile during pregnancy.

 

Risks Associated With Bean Sprouts When Pregnant:

  • Raw bean sprouts have been proved to be more prone to E. coli and salmonella bacteria infection. Such infected sprouts may cause health problems in pregnant women with symptoms like head ache, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever and bloody diarrhea.
  • If you are allergic to pulses and legumes then you may be allergic to bean sprouts too.

 

The tasty and nutritious bean sprouts can be consumed during pregnancy after having a word with your healthcare provider.

 

Image Credit: seriouseats.com

 

 

 

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